sig eventsSIG Events

Overview

SIG events will take place on Wednesday, April 17, 2024.

Please kindly note that SIG events will take place at three different locations:

You can find the exact location of each SIG in the table below. 
The walking distance from the Radisson Blu Hotel Lietuva to other locations is around 20-30 minutes.

FULL DAY SIG EVENTS HALF DAY SIG EVENTS | Morning HALF DAY SIG EVENTS | Afternoon
Conversation Analysis and Social Work (Radisson: Epsilon room) Social Work, Disability and Disability Rights (Faculty of Philosophy, VU, Universiteto st. 9, room 209) Social Work and Health CANCELLED
Critical Realism and Social Work Research (Radisson: Omicron room) Combining Employment and Care in a Lifecycle Perspective (Radisson: Beta room) Mental Health (Faculty of Philosophy, VU, Universiteto st. 9, room 209)
User Involvement (Morning Session - Radisson: Zeta room; Afternoon Session - Radisson: Beta room) Social Work: Social Justice and Human Rights (Faculty of Philosophy, VU, Universiteto st. 9, room 207) CANCELLED Social Work Ethics Research Goup ((Faculty of Philosophy, VU, Universiteto st. 9, room 207)
Social Work Practice Research (Radisson: Zeta room) DARSIG (Faculty of Philosophy, VU, Universiteto st. 9, room 214) Social Work, Crime and Criminal Justice (Caritas Vilnius. Didžioji st. 5)
Substance Use and Social Work (Radisson: Gamma room) Social Work Practice Education and Supervision (Radisson: Beta room) Post-Soviet and Post-Socialist Social Work (Faculty of Philosophy, VU, Universiteto st. 9, room 214)
Social Work, History and Research (Radisson: Delta room) Arts in Social Work (Radisson: Beta room)
Social Work with Adolescents (Radisson: Tau room) SWIFT - Social Work in Film and Television (Radisson: Beta room)
Evidence in Practice (Radisson: Omega room) PhD/Early Career Researcher (Radisson: Iota room)
Research on Social Work and Policy Engagement (Radisson: Theta room)
Social Work and the More-than-human (Radisson: Lambda 2 room)
Children’s Rights in Practice (Radisson: Eta room)
Gerontological Social Work (Radisson: Lambda 1 room)
Workforce (Radisson: Lambda 3 room)

SIG events' programme

Full day events:

Social Work Communication Training Using Conversation Analysis

We are delighted to announce our very first conference event as a Special Interest Group at the European Social Work Research Association. In previous years, we have hosted a workshop and presented oral papers, but this year we have our own event which will go on through the day as part of the SIG events programme on the 17th of April.

Our theme for the day is Social work communication training using conversation analysis. This event will focus on teaching of communication skills in social work, and how conversation analysis can be a useful foundation for research-based teaching. In providing detailed and tangible data-driven knowledge about how social interaction between social workers and clients works in practice, conversation analysis is an approach that is naturally fitted to communication skills training in social work programs. This year’s CASW SIG event offers the possibility to share ideas and experiences about how to develop research-based teaching of communication skills, and discuss how we use CA in this area.

09:30–10:00Welcome and introductions – Jon Symonds, Chair
10:00–10:20Using CA in social work communication training A – presenter 1
10:20–10:40Using CA in social work communication training B – presenter 2
10:40–11:00     Using CA in social work communication training C – presenter 3
11:00–11:20Using CA in social work communication training D – presenter 4

11:20–12:00 

Joint discussion: Experiences and ideas on the applicability of CA in teaching – led by Marie Flinkfeldt
12:00-13:00Lunch break
13:00-14:30Data session: Communication training in practice – led by Sabine Jørgensen & Clara Iversen
14:30-15:30Special interest group members’ meeting, chaired by Jon Symonds
15:30Finish – Jon Symonds, Chair

We look forward to seeing you there!

Questions or ideas can be sent to clara.iversen@uu.se, marie.flinkfeldt@uu.se, or jon.symonds@bristol.ac.uk

SIG page

Critical Realism and Emancipatory Social Work Research. Theoretical and Methodological Reflections on Action Research and User Participation.

Analytical research on societal mechanisms and structural inequalities is more urgent than ever. Given that social work ought to be consistent with the broader purposes of the profession, the question of how and to what extent research can contribute to the realization of human rights and social justice is important. Participatory research is relevant for social work research on political and emancipatory issues but challenging to implement in practice. In the 2024 SIG, we wish to focus on several topics, closely related to critical realism´s vision of an emancipatory social science, where participation, transformation, normativity, interdisciplinarity, and ethics are central. We want to take a closer look at action research and specifically focus on how a critical realist perspective can underpin and guide the change that action research seeks. Action research may allow focusing on structural mechanisms more than on individual explanations of the most wicked problems of our time.

The SIG will also encourage exposing and discussing other methodological approaches, traditions, and practices using critical theories, for example from research in social work in public services, integration of immigrants, child and family care, elderly care, and other research fields. We want to highlight both the opportunities and challenges of emancipatory research and discuss the researcher’s role as an active reformer and the modified role that such a position presupposes and challenges.

We welcome presentations of a broad spectrum of research in social work to this full-day seminar.  We hope for attendance from researchers interested in theories of science in general and who are curious about the potential of action research and critical realism. We welcome presentations of ongoing or finalized work – as well as research that has not yet started.

Send your abstract of a maximum of 300 words to the convenors by March 18th. Acceptance of abstracts will be sent by March 20th. Please get in touch with us for questions or if you wish to discuss your contribution.

Best wishes from the SIG convenors,

Monica Kjørstad (monica@oslomet.no)
Anu-Riina Svenlin (anu-riina.svenlin@jyu.fi)
Didier Boost (didier.boost@uantwerpen.be)

Please find the preliminary program below:

09:30-10:00

Welcome and introduction to critical realism and this year´s SIG.
Anu-Riina Svenlin

10:00-10:45Emancipation in praxis and research in social work – a critical realist perspective.
Monica Kjørstad
10:45-11:00Coffee break
11:00-11:45    Emancipation, language and normativity – action research and critical realism.
Håvard Åslund
11:45-12:00Discussion
12:00-13:00Lunch break
13:00-13:45Critical Realism and emancipation: A reflection on the role of the social work researcher.
Didier Boost
13:45-14:15Participant’s presentations/Discussion
14:15-14:30Coffee break
14:30-15:00Participant´s presentations/Discussion
15:00-15:30SIG administrative meeting: future planning/book project

SIG page

User Involvement and the Digitalization of Services

In this pre-conference we will elaborate on the main conference’s theme – technological innovations and how it may impact on research, practice and education. How are service users affected by the increased use of digital tools? How is their interaction and encountering with services influenced in the era of digitalization? Does digital tools for meeting and assisting users influence their feeling of being included, recognized, or do they miss the ‘face-to-face’-meeting in real life etc.? Are special ethics and values contested when social work practice is carried out in a context where technological tools mediates the interaction between the stakeholders? How do the digitalisation in education and in research affect our collaboration with service users?

We will meet and share research findings and theoretical/conceptual ideas about these topics in our SIG event. As announced in the call, the first half of the day will be organised in collaboration with the SIG for Social Work Practice Research. Our two SIGs share many interests and partly overlap. This is reflected for example in the research’s aim of giving voice to all stakeholders (including silenced voices) and the use of research methods where co-creation is carried out and approached in various ways.

PROGRAM

 

Ethical questions about digitalization in social work research

Questions around practical and ethical issues might come up in research on digitalisation, and we want to explore them in depth with each other. Is there a need of special research ethics for social work research, in order to underpin the values and intended goals of social work in the research we conduct? We suggest the following themes to be of interest: 1. Privacy and legislation, 2. Ethical commission, 3. Digitalization, and 4. Tension of two logics: rules and relation. We invite everyone to join us and step into the World Cafe and explore this together.

 

09:00-09:15 Welcome by SIG conveners (Catrine T. Halås, Martine Ganzelves, Sidsel Natland, Kristel Driessens). Short introductions of the participants.

 

09:15-09:30 Presentation of the theme and working form with the four questions

 

09:30-11:15 World Café method (Three tables: 1 x 30 minute and 2 x 20 minutes)

 

11:15-12:00 Summing up and conclusions

 

12:00-13:00 Lunch break

 

 User involvement in the era of digitalization

 

13:00-13:15 Welcome to the separate meeting for the SIG on User Involvement: Kristel Driessens and Sidsel Natland.

 
13:15-13:40 Service User Involvement in the context of Digital Projects in Social Work – The Implementation of a Digital Social Route Map for Western Austria: Thomas Dierker, The Entrepreneurial School Innsbruck, Austria

 

13:40-13:50 Questions and comments

 

13:50-13:55    5 minutes break

 

13:55-14:15 Technological innovations for and through service user involvement: Marlene-Anne Dettmann, HAW Hamburg, Department Social Work & Gisela Meier, Zurich University of Applied Science, Department Social Work.

 

14:15-14:20 Questions and comments

 

14:20-14:45 Creating dialogical space for epistemic justice: Jean-Pierre Wilken, Utrecht University of Applied Sceinces.

 

14:45-14:55 Questions and comments

 

14:55-15:05   10 minutes break

 

15:05-15:20 Plans for the future. Webinars, co-writing for journal – how can we collaborate/are we interested in more collaboration than the annual SIG event? Are we still discussing the name of our SIG? Etc.

 

15:20-15:30 Summary of the day – comments and inputs

 

 

Transformative Learning – All Involved Can Learn

Scientific knowledge should feed social work practice and, on the other hand, the knowledge present in practice should also feed science. Conducting social work practice research is in many cases not only a means to inform practice and policy by answering a research question (achieving a knowledge goal) but also to help improve social services and bring about change, to develop concrete tools and products and to learn with those involved. Conducting research is therefore always a sharing and learning experience, not at least for the researcher.

Learning can be attained by giving stakeholders a role in research. Although practice research does not necessarily coincide with participatory research, aiming for a higher level of participation of stakeholders from practice -users and providers, policy and education is a logical choice to better serve Social Work purposes. This may include diversifying the designs and methods used, and making more use of the strengths in mixed methods designs. The goal of learning can also be an explicit goal in a research project. Research then serves as a didactic tool.

A model for clarifying the different modalities of learning in research is that of Markauskaite & Goodyear (2017). They present research as a rich environment in which learning can take place in five directions:

  1. Up: by connecting practical experience to theory;
  2. Inward: by learning more about one’s own person and professionalism;
  3. Forward: by developing new acting knowledge for future action;
  4. To the side: by becoming more skilled in mutual cooperation, often across disciplines;
  5. Downwards: by becoming more solid because there is better insight into contextual limitations
    and own preferences and to learn better from daily experiences.

The first half day of the event will be co-organised with the service user involvement SIG, and the second half day of the event will be independently organized by the SWPR SIG. Details, please see the following.

Morning Session (9am-12noon): Joint Seminar with the Special Interest Group for Service User Involvement

The other half of the day will be a joint meeting with the SIG Social Work Practice Research. There we will discuss the ethical questions about GDPR, procedures and digitalization, related to practice research. We think about concrete items, we are all struggling with:

  • Data protection regulations and how GDPR are met and handled in different national contexts when it comes to research where service users, practitioners etc are required to have an active part in research, as co-researchers and in partnerships with conventional researchers.
  • The procedures and requirements of the ethical commission. Are they adapted to the specificities of social work practice research with the involvement of service users?
  • Digitalization in our research processes – pitfalls and opportunities for the inclusion of service users
  • Tension between two logics: rules/procedures/protocols (protection and rights) versus making connection and relationship-based research.

This joint meeting will be facilitated by the World Café method, focusing on dialogue, participation, and interaction. By this we kindly invite all participants with an interest in these topics to join this stimulating and challenging event!

Afternoon Session (1-3.30pm) : SWPR SIG on ‘Transformative Learning’  

  • We invite participants to share their experiences about how they address and shape learning in their work.
  • Abstracts are not necessary to join in. We ask participants to prepare by reflecting on their experiences of transformative learning together.
    • Describe your learning experience – who is learning and what is learned in your research project?
    • Facilitation of learning – how do you make the desirable learning possible, what models do you base on, and challenges faced by educators.
    • What are your inspirations in promoting ‘transformative learning’ in social work practice and research?
  • The output of the activities has the potential to build/to construct a new framework together.

Webinars ahead of Vilnius

In a series of activities, the SIG Social Work Practice Research explore how the learning component of practice research can be further strengthened; how to reinforce the opportunity for all stakeholders (including the SW researcher) for learning during and after the research. The following questions guide the content of the meetings: What’s in it for the different participants (empowerment)? What is the relation between learning and change (how to create impact?). What learning theories are informing Social Work Practice Research. How is new technology helpful in facilitating the learning and change in SWPR.

Two webinars are organized ahead of the annual meeting during the ECSWR. In these interactive sessions, in addition to engaging speakers, there will be plenty of room to interact and share experiences, best practices and failures. And thus, also learn together as a result.

  • Webinar 1 has as its topic: Teaching practice research through partnerships with field educators, social work, communities and university, Laura Yliruka.
  • Webinar 2 has the focus on mutual learning with students in social work education (BA and MA) Bas van Lanen (the Netherlands) is keynote speaker.

Organizing committee:

  • Elke Plovie, University of Applied Sciences UC Leuven-Limburg (Belgium)
  • Sara Serbati, Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Pedagogy and Applied Psychology, University of Padova (Italy)
  • Sui Ting Kong, Department of Sociology, Durham University (UK)
  • Simone Boogaarts, HAN University of Applied Sciences (the Netherlands)

Conveners:

  • Catrine Torbjørnsen Halås, Department of Social Science, Nord University (Norway)
  • Martine Ganzevles, HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht (the Netherlands)

SIG Page

SIG Convenors: Sari Lindeman & Ines Arendt

The SIG “Substance Use and Social Work” was founded in 2018. Since then, we have been able to publish a book (“Long-term Recovery from Substance Use: International Social Care Perspectives”, Editors: Sarah Galvani, Alastair Roy & Amanda Clayson) and engage in different international research activities.

During our annual full-day SIG event in the framework of the ECSWR conference, we will meet face-to-face and take time to discuss, exchange, and reflect on current topics regarding substance use and addiction in our different contexts, fields, and countries. The SIG is a self organised group, and we are always open to new participants.

The aims of the group are simply to bring together like-minded people from the European and International social work community to share ideas and develop links from which we can further develop our research on this topic and its application to social work practice and education.

The SIG’s focus is on social work, social care, and substance use issues. While health discourse tends to dominate research around substance use, this special interest group recognises how substance use can often stem from and lead to social harms. Identifying and addressing these harms are part of the everyday practice of many social work and social care professionals.

On Wednesday, April 17, 2024, we will meet in a full day event in Vilnius.

Preliminary timetable (to be finalised):

09:30-12:00Welcoming, group introduction and short input (presentations of work/ research from the group
12:00-13:00Lunch break
13:00-15.30Part II: Working together: Data analyses and time for discussion There will also be coffee breaks and time for networking during the event.

SIG page

09:30-10:00Welcome & Introductions
Prof. Susanne Maurer & Dr Darren Hill
10:00-10:30“Wages paid with milk money.” Rural residential care institutions within changing agricultural structures
Prof. Gisela Hauss & Prof. Kevin Heiniger
10:30-11:00Social Work as “White Woman’s Burden”? Imperial Translations of the Profession between Germany and Latin America in the 1930s and 1940s – An Archival Study
Dr Dayana Lau & Dr Fallon Tiffany Cabral
11:00-11:30Resistance to child labor in Athens, Georgia: Reformers, class privilege, and compromise in the early 20th-century
Dr Jane McPherson
11:30-12:00Questions, Discussion & Summary
Prof. Susanne Maurer & Dr Darren Hill
12:00-13:00Lunch break
13:00-13:30Putting the ‘social’ back into community mental health work with young people.
Dr Erika Laredo
13:30-14:00Fast paper and false prophets: corporate parenting in child welfare
Dr Jade Purtell, Dr Mya Ballin & Dr Joanna Evans
14:00-14:30Knowledge and training of social workers at Danish residential care centres though hundred years
Prof Inge. Bryderup
15:00-15:30Questions, Summary & Call for Papers ESWRA Journal
Prof. Susanne Maurer & Dr Darren Hill

SIG page

Exploring creative, ethical, and innovative research, policy and practice with adolescents across Europe

This pre-conference event will comprise a full day workshop focussing on shared interests in research, policy, and social work practice with adolescents. We would warmly welcome both current SIG members alongside anyone else interested in joining us on the day and hope that the meeting will allow us to continue ongoing discussions regarding shared substantive interests related to creative, ethical, and innovative research and practice with young people at risk of harm.

This is the first year we will hold a day-long workshop for the SIG and we have planned a full schedule of activities to learn from and with each other. In the morning we’ve invited someone from Lithuania’s Youth Culture Digital Archive (acronym JAUKA), to come and share with us. The archive, created by multi-disciplinary researchers at Vilnius University, houses hundreds of examples of youth informal cultural creations from the Soviet era to present day. We hope this will be an opportunity for us to experience learning together, as a group of researchers who share a love of learning about- and learning from-young people. 

In the afternoon, we will spend time exploring shared research interests and potential collaborative projects through the lens of two key questions: 

  1. Social work with adolescents: aligned to or at odds with the ethics of the profession? 
  2. What are the most pressing issues facing adolescents in receipt of social work support (or who are engaged in social work research)?

If you have any questions about the SIG, please contact Kristi Langhoff at k.e.langhoff@sussex.ac.uk

SIG page

09:30-09:40Members arrive, informal exchange and networking introductions
09:40-11:00

Key input by Beth Coulthard, Ulster University and Brian Taylor, Professor Emeritus Ulster University.

Big Data Analytics … Evidence-based tools for social work? (Will a robot steal your job?!)

Three short presentations followed by clarifying questions; then time for discussion.
1) Use of data to inform service planning & decision making – evidence by statistical comparison
2) Therapies delivered by computerised systems – evidence by experimental comparison
3) Large language models – evidence by comparison with theory/common sense!

11:30–12:00     

Questions and discussions emerging from presentations
Discussion of evidence for value of big data for social work, and for EiPSIG in particular.

12:00–13:00Lunch break
13:00-15:30 Business Meeting. Plans for next year. Prioritization of actions address.
15:30Close and thank you

SIG page

Cutting Edge Research on the Policy Engagement of Social Workers:
A Cross National Perspective

09:30-09:40Introduction by Idit Weiss-Gal (Tel Aviv University)
Session 1. Social Workers’ Policy Practice: Quantitative Analyses in a Cross-National Perspective
Chair: Idit Weiss-Gal (Tel Aviv University)
09:40-10:00Germany – Miriam Burzlaff (Neubrandenburg University of Applied Sciences)
10:00-10:20Switzerland – Tobias Kindler (OST, Hebrew University)
10:20–10:45United States – Dan Ferris (Washington University)
10:45-11:00Coffee break 
11:00-11:20Finland – Christian Kroll, Helena Blomberg (Helsinki University), Johanna Kallio (University of Turku)
11:20-11:40Italy – Riccardo Guidi (University of Florence)
11:40-12:00Portugal – Rita Carrilho (ISCTE-IUL), Francisco Branco (Portuguese Catholic University)
12:00-13:00Lunch break
Session 2. Cutting Edge Research on the Policy Engagement of Social Workers
Chair: Riccardo Guidi (University of Florence)
13:00-13:20On the relationship between policy practice and ‘deviant’ social work – evidence from a case study on micro- and macro-level political actions of social workers.
Laura Einhorn (Applied University of Cologne)
13:20-13:40Influencing social policies: Social workers assess the effectiveness of their strategies
Marsela Dauti, Erika Bejko (University of Tirana)
13:40-14:00Social workers as human rights actor: Identifying strategies in a collaboration learning community
Michelle van der Tier, Melih Samson (HAN University of Applied Sciences)
14:00-14:15Discussion
14:15-14:30Coffee break
14:30-14:50Policy practice in war times: Case study of social services in mixed cities
Roni Strier (Haifa University)
14:50-15:10Social work and social work title in Canada: The waning influence of social work on Canadian social policy
Hugh Shewell (Carleton University)
15:10-15:30‘Raising their voices’: Explaining the policy practice of minority social workers in multicultural societies
Hani Nouman (Haifa University)

SIG page

Theme of Social Work Geographies, Or, The Place/s Of Social Work 

Social work takes place in an array of contexts including in government offices, private homes, streets, community centres, prisons, courts, hospitals, schools, care homes, clinics, parks, virtual rooms, phonelines and many more. The place of social work is distinct to each encounter as place is a production of the social, material, and temporal (Massey, 2005; Thrift, 2008). Since Lefebvre (Lefebvre, 1991a, 1991b) we know that space is always political and that its politics operates at the intersection of the material and social (Amin, 2012; Amin and Thrift, 2013). Place is an event that cannot be reduced to a single representation (Lorimer, 2005; Thrift, 2008) and is always more than human. The social work literature however evinces a persistent dichotomy between social and physical place (Akesson, Burns & Hordyk, 2017), and our scholarship has yet to establish a conceptual grounding for exploring power and place (Ratliff, 2019). An exploration of social work geographies, or the places of social work, can therefore offer insights into the politics of social work events and how these are shaped by their material and organic facets as much as by human action and intent.

Our event this year includes six contributions exploring the geographies and places of social work:

  • Mapping young people’s neighborhood nature places towards sustainable well-being and social inclusion: Implications for social work
    James Obeng, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) & University of Jyväskylä
  • Social (work) places in carceral settings
    Julia Emprechtinger & Marina Richter, HES-SO Valais-Wallis, Switzerland
  • Geography of social work: Social planning as a contribution to territorial stigmatization?
    Marius Otto, University of Applied Sciences Landshut, Germany
  • Virtual research with children of migrant parents in rural China during COVID-19: Constructing a multidimensional sense of place
    Shuang (Daisy) Wu, Susan P. Kemp, and Allen Bartley, University of Auckland, NZ
  • Representations of place and land in undergraduate social work textbooks in settler Canada
    Tina Wilson, University of British Columbia, Canada
  • Talking in place – Walking interviews as a method for ecosocial work research
    Verena Fisch, Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland

SIG page

Pre-Conference Title. A Future Where Children’s Rights are Protected

Professionals worldwide are struggling with fulfilling their children’s rights obligations and acting in line with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. When speaking about children’s rights in practice this goes into both child participation (known as article 12 in the UNCRC), but also issues related to the other articles: definition of a child (article 1), best interest of the child (article 3), care (article 7), protection (article 19, 33, 34), education (article 28), play (article 31), recovery (article 39).  There is a myriad of challenges in everyday social and child welfare and protection work with children and their families trying to enact these legal obligations.

As a recently created SIG group, we want to surface, discuss, and explore some of these challenges to expand and deepen practical, research and theoretical developments in the field. This year, given the conference theme of ‘Envisioning the Future’ we want to focus on the ever-quickening pace of modernity and its impact on children’s rights.  As researchers, practitioners, policy makers and PhD students, we want to be able to respond with agility and flexibility to the future challenges of participation, protection, and inclusion. As a SIG we therefore want to be future orientated so a particular focus this year given the conference theme will be placed on identifying current and emerging threats to children’s rights and how we as a SIG can respond to these challenges.  During the pre-conference event we will therefore focus on identifying and critically exploring future research, practice, and policy priorities so we can shape the research, practice, and policy agenda for the incoming year. This will enable us to set achievable targets in terms of areas for collaborative research topics and identifying possible funders. We can also discuss and agree possible papers for publication, share practice responses to modernity and discuss how we can influence policy developments across Europe.  Further extension of this modernity discourse will be to discuss the possible use of technology, immersive video, and artificial intelligence as possible emerging tools to enhance participation, protection, and inclusion. 

The general aim of our SIG in Vilnius therefore is to provide a forum to bring together international scholars, policy makers, research students, managers, and practitioners interested in issues related to children’s rights in practice across various organizations (public and non-governmental) to examine the challenges of modernity, envision the future of children’s rights across Europe and produce research led solutions. 

Preliminary Agenda

TimeThemeFormatLead
09:30-10:00IntroductionsPresentation & outline of the pre-conference activities. Plus verbal introductions from each member. Paul McCafferty
10:00-11:00

Modernity and children’s rights.
Taking stock of where we are and envisioning the future of children’s rights in Europe: Challenges & opportunities.

Small group discussion.
Present feedback on flipchart for discussion. 

Esther Mercardo Garcia
11:00-11:20Break
11:20-12:00

Back to the future.
Findings from 3 focus groups on the use of technology and artificial intelligence to support C&YP’s participation: The good, the bad and the ugly.

PowerPoint & small group discussion Paul McCafferty & Gerry Marshall.
12:00-13:00

Lunch

13:00-14:20

Research & Theory.
Presentation of 4 research articles. 

1. Cecilie Marie Zachariassen: UiT Noregs arktiske universitet. Conformed.

2. Ieva Salkauskiene: NTNU / Norwegian University of Science and Technology: Norway.

PowerPoint & questionsPaul McCafferty
14:20-14:45

Writing groups.
Create writing groups for possible collaborative papers to be published this incoming year. OR discuss the possibility of writing a book. 

Round Table Discussion Inger Sofie Dahlø Husby
14:45-15:15

SIG Committee business

 Paul McCafferty
15:30

Finish

  

Dr. Paul McCafferty p.mccafferty@qub.ac.uk corresponding author.

(On behalf of the Children’s Rights in Practice SIG: Participation, Protection, Inclusion)
Dr. Esther Mercado,
Dr. Inger Sofie Dahlø Husby.
Lecturer Wendy Eerdekens.

SIG page

Agenda for the Gerontological Social Work SIG event.

  • Welcome with introductions and overview of the ENGSW SIG
  • Updates on SIG activity
  • Short papers: Social Work with Older people
  • Research updates from SIG members and mapping of research interests
  • Visibility of GSW
  • SIG activity for the year ahead
  • AOB

SIG page

Preparing and Sustaining the Social Work Workforce. Research on Critical Issues and Challenges in International Social Work Workforce Contexts

08:45-09:00

Meeting of the Social Work Workforce Special Interest Group – social in person meeting of the workforce SIG with coffee

Theme:  Working Conditions, Well-being, Staffing and Turnover

09:00-09:15

Working conditions in the Nordic Countries – a comparison between Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden”. Pia Tham, Steinunn Hrafnsdottir, Gunn-Astrid Baugerud, Cecilie Kolonda Moesby Jensen, Andreas Baldschun

09:15-09:30

A reflection on the planning of global social worker working conditions and wellbeing research study. Jermaine Ravalier, Bath Spa University, Paula McFadden, Ulster University. David Jones, IFSW. Rory Truell, IFSW.

09:30-09:45What do child protection social workers consider to be the factors underpinning workforce instability within Children’s Social Care? Ciaran Murphy. Edgehill University, Lancashire, UK.
09:45-10:00

Safe Staffing in Social Work’ legislative developments: Defining Safe Staffing in Social Work from the workforce perspective  Paula Mc Fadden. Ulster University, Northern Ireland.

10:00-10:30

Coffee break

 

Theme: Highlighting Social Work Challenges, Practice Issues and Research

10:30-10:45

Prospects and challenges of participatory action research in promoting the capabilities of child welfare workers. Maija Mänttäri-van der Kuip. University of Jyväskylä, Finland.

10:45-11:00

The role of managers in improving working conditions in child welfare social work. Amanda Norrgård. University of Gävle, Sweden.

11:00-11:15

The opportunities and challenges of conducting hybrid ethnographic research in social work teams.’ Sara Carder, University of East Anglia. UK.

11:15-11:30Findings from a qualitative study of child protection social workers and managers who experience social media / online abuse and harassment.  Kenneth Burns, Olwen Halvey and Fiachra Ó Súilleabháin. University College Cork. Ireland.
11:30-11:45

Fast tracked into social work during COVID: impact on wellbeing and practice’. Mary Baginsky, Kings College London.

11:45-12:00

The dual-qualified (social worker/nurse) integrated practitioner role: challenges and opportunities for the health and social care workforce. Julie Feather, Edgehill University, Lancashire, UK

12:00-13:00

Lunch break

Theme: Resilience, reducing stress and burnout

13:15-13:30

Surviving the first months in practice: Newly Qualified Social Workers from 2016-2019 reflections on preparation for practice two years later. Siv-Britt Björktomta, PhD. Uppsala University, Sweden

13:30-13:45

The role of education in developing students’ professional resilience for social work practice.  Sarah Hitchcock. Southern Cross University. Australia (online)

13:45-14:00

What works in reducing social workers’ stress and burnout? Florin Lazar, Daniela Gaba, Anca Mihai, Georgiana-Cristina Rentea, Lucian Alecu, Ovidiu Pop, Adrian Luca, Elen-Silvana Crivoi (Bobarnat), Ana-Maria Mustatea, Romania.

14:00-14:15

Retention and resilience among social workers during the pandemic. Simon Cauvain. Nottingham Trent University, UK.

14:15-14:30

Implementing a Custom Designed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program with Frontline Child Protection Workers in Kentucky, Austin Griffiths Kim Link, Kara Haughtigan, Lindsey Powell, Western Kentucky University USA. Online (last due to time difference)

14:30-15:00

Common discussion and closing

Contact details and affiliation:

Paula McFadden, Ulster University, Northern Ireland  p.mcfadden@ulster.ac.uk, 
Pia Tham, Uppsala University, Sweden  pia.tham@uu.se, Maija Mänttäri-van der Kuip, University of Jyväskylä, Finland  maija.manttari@jyu.fi 

SIG page

Half day events | Morning

09:30 – 09:45

Roni Holler (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) and Limor Gadot (Sapir Academic College)

Session 1. Autonomy and Voice Among People with Disability     

09:45 – 10:45
  • Assistance in decision making – features of the new service in Lithuania.
    Jurga Mataitytė-Diržienė, Jurga Mataityte-Dirziene, Egle Sumskiene, Violeta Gevorgianiene, Aidas Gudavicius, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania.
  • Service Users’ Knowledge about their Victimization of Violence in Close Relationships: An Epistemic (In)Justice Perspective
    Filippa Klint, School of behavioural, social and legal sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
10:45 – 11:00     Coffee break

Session 2 . Challenges and Successes in Promoting Disability Rights in Social Welfare and Social Work Practices and Polices 

11:00 – 11:45

  • Social Work Supervision in the Disability Field: A Systematic Literature Review
    Ayelet Gur and Michal Klein, Social Work Department, Tel-Hai College, Israel.
  • Israeli Social Workers’ Recommendations on Residential Settings for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities
    Shirli Werner and Roni Holler, Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social Welfare, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.
  • Administrative Burden as Disempowerment: Recognition, Voice, and Dignity in Encounters with Mental Health Service Users
    Noam Tarshish, School of Social Work, University of Haifa, Israel
  • Work-Family Balance, Meaning in Life, and Parental Stress Among Parents of Children With and Without Disabilities Aged 0-12
    Maayan Fine, Limor Gadot, Einav Segev, School of Social work, Sapir Academic College, Israel
11:45 – 12:00Concluding remarks

SIG page

Combining Employment and Care in a Lifecycle Perspective. New Challenges for Company Social Work.

Convenors
Prof. Dr. Thomas Geisen and Prof. Dr. Sibylle Nideröst
University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland

Theme
The significance of formal and informal supports and barriers on the company level for combining employment and informal care in a lifecycle perspective has rarely been investigated. Whereas research on combining family and vocation with young children seems to be well established in companies, research indicates that firms have rarely actively addressed the topic of combining employment and care for elder relatives, and many seem unaware of the challenges employees are facing and the support they need. If firms offer support, they often favour individual, case-based solutions, whereas systematic approaches seem less likely to be put in place. To date we lack differentiated knowledge about the connections between expectations, ongoing processes, processes of negotiation and the establishment of formal and informal structures within companies. Therefore, there is a need for research on job-oriented and welfare-state related problems of the work-elder care balance, such as the changes that occur to the caregiving demands and the measures taken in response, as well as the work-young children care balance. There is also a lack of knowledge regarding the role of social work professionals in the field of company social work, when addressing combining employment and care issues at large. Against this background, we want to discuss the following questions:

  • What challenges can be identified in combining employment and care in a lifecycle perspective?
  • How can professional social work support employers and employees with care obligations in companies?
  • How can social work research contribute to a better understanding of the situation of employees, combining employment and care in a lifecycle perspective?

Input

  • Thomas Geisen and Sibylle Nideröst: “Social practices of combining employment and car for older people in companies in Switzerland. Findings from company case studies”
  • Sibylle Nideröst and Thomas Geisen: “Combining employment and care for older people in a Lifecycle Perspective. Findings from a representative quantitative company-study in Switzerland”

Round Table Discussion

Based on the input from a current research project on combining employment and care for older relatives in Switzerland and Austria (COMBECA), we want to discuss (1) further experiences from other countries, the role of company social work in combining employment and care in a lifecycle perspective, and further research needs. Additionally (2) we want to discuss how the topic of combining employment and care in a lifecycle perspective can be further established and developed as a highly relevant field in social work research and practice.

Call for further country reports

If you are interested to present the situation in your country regarding combining employment and care in a lifecycle perspective, please get in touch with both of the convenors: thomas.geisen@fhnw. and sybille.nideroes@fhnw.ch

Part 1: Social Work and Human Rights: a Community-based Perspective
Part 2: Future Activities and Organisation of the SIG

Preliminary program

The programme for the SIG ‘Social Work: Social Justice and Human Rights’ will consist of 2 parts:

  1. In part 1, we discuss a ‘current topic’ in the field of social work and human rights
  2. In part 2, we have an exchange of ideas about the work of the SIG

Part 1: Social Work and Human Rights: a Community-based Perspective

Human rights are considered as a foundation for social work. This is recognized in the global definition of social work. Consequently, social work is often regarded as a ‘human rights profession’ (Mapp et al., 2019; Healy, 2008). However, much of the debate on social work and human rights remains at the level of a human rights regime that focus on institutionalised translation of human rights in legal frameworks or formal institutions. There is an important account in social work literature for the international human rights regime of declarations, conventions, monitoring processes, etc. from a rather technocratic perspective (Ife, 2012). While these ‘top-down’ approaches can be of major relevance for social work in supporting the realisation of human rights, much less is known about the way social work deals with human rights from a community-based perspective. In contrast to top-down approaches, a community-based perspective starts from daily life experiences of people with injustice that take place in local contexts. Such a community-based perspective on human rights in social work is characterized by its focus on bringing people together with common interests, highlighting participation and democratic decision-making, facilitating learning processes amongst community members building upon members’ knowledge and bringing about change and social justice in communities (Lundy, 2011). A community-based perspective acknowledges the collective character of human rights in social work, as human rights are collectively constructed, collectively understood and collectively experienced (Ife & Fiske, 2006).

During this SIG, we aim to further entangle a community-based perspective on human rights in social work. More in particular, we want to discuss different ideas of community-based approaches and how these can contribute to achieving a better understanding of the way human rights in social work are constructed. Based on 3 presentations, we will explore this issue:

  1. Understanding human rights through the life worlds of communities (Charlotte Kemmeren, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences). In the minor program ‘Community organizing and human rights’ at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, international students practice with the first steps of community organizing from a human rights perspective. They are introduced to community based social work with underrepresented and vulnerable communities in Amsterdam, such as undocumented migrants, or around urgent themes such as neighborhood cohesion, poverty and green sustainability. During this presentation, we will focus on how to create a constructive attitude towards the meaning of human rights for communities in the context of social work education.
  2. Understanding the role of the social worker in a human rights perspective from below (Elke Plovie, UCLL University of Applied Sciences). In our research on informal actors in social work practices, we noticed an interesting dynamic of citizens organizing themselves based on a common interest or shared story of violation of human rights. Citizens experience situations of injustice in their own life or are confronted with violations in the daily life of people they know. We identified two different approaches in their way of guaranteeing human rights. In a first approach, citizens develop collective solutions for a collective problem. In the second approach, citizens turn private matters into public issues. We see how citizen initiatives contribute to a process of politicization in different ways. This will be critically discussed during the presentation.
  3. Social work and Human rights: a Lifeworld Orientation (Didier Reynaert, HOGENT University of Applied Sciences and Arts). How social workers ‘act’ when construction human rights from below still remains a black box. To date, social work scholarship insufficiently succeed to gain ‘praxis-knowledge’ showing how social workers ‘act’ when using the framework of human rights. An action-based approach to social work and human rights starts from daily life experiences of people with injustice. In this presentation, we aim to give empirical insight in how social workers construct human rights from a lifeworld orientation. Based on our empirical data, we will discuss both opportunities as well as pitfalls of a lifeworld orientation on human rights in social work.

Part 2: Future Activities and Organisation of the SIG

The second part of the SIG event will provide opportunities to shape the SIG’s future. We aim to engage all participants in discussions about potential future themes and topics for the SIG. These may include community work and human rights, decolonization and human rights, responses of social work to right-wing movements in Europe, and more. Additionally, we wish to explore future modes of communication and collaboration, such as regular online SIG meetings with presentations, online seminars, book projects, etc.

To maintain the SIG’s productivity and accomplish collective activities, we also invite participants to consider becoming co-coordinators of the SIG. Only with a dedicated group of coordinators can the SIG remain active and gain more visibility. Those interested can contact the current co-coordinators beforehand. The process for appointing co-coordinators will be discussed directly at the SIG event.

SIG page

Part 1: Social Work and Human Rights: a Community-based Perspective
Part 2: Future Activities and Organisation of the SIG

Preliminary program

The programme for the SIG ‘Social Work: Social Justice and Human Rights’ will consist of 2 parts:

  1. In part 1, we discuss a ‘current topic’ in the field of social work and human rights
  2. In part 2, we have an exchange of ideas about the work of the SIG

Part 1: Social Work and Human Rights: a Community-based Perspective

Human rights are considered as a foundation for social work. This is recognized in the global definition of social work. Consequently, social work is often regarded as a ‘human rights profession’ (Mapp et al., 2019; Healy, 2008). However, much of the debate on social work and human rights remains at the level of a human rights regime that focus on institutionalised translation of human rights in legal frameworks or formal institutions. There is an important account in social work literature for the international human rights regime of declarations, conventions, monitoring processes, etc. from a rather technocratic perspective (Ife, 2012). While these ‘top-down’ approaches can be of major relevance for social work in supporting the realisation of human rights, much less is known about the way social work deals with human rights from a community-based perspective. In contrast to top-down approaches, a community-based perspective starts from daily life experiences of people with injustice that take place in local contexts. Such a community-based perspective on human rights in social work is characterized by its focus on bringing people together with common interests, highlighting participation and democratic decision-making, facilitating learning processes amongst community members building upon members’ knowledge and bringing about change and social justice in communities (Lundy, 2011). A community-based perspective acknowledges the collective character of human rights in social work, as human rights are collectively constructed, collectively understood and collectively experienced (Ife & Fiske, 2006).

During this SIG, we aim to further entangle a community-based perspective on human rights in social work. More in particular, we want to discuss different ideas of community-based approaches and how these can contribute to achieving a better understanding of the way human rights in social work are constructed. Based on 3 presentations, we will explore this issue:

  1. Understanding human rights through the life worlds of communities (Charlotte Kemmeren, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences). In the minor program ‘Community organizing and human rights’ at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, international students practice with the first steps of community organizing from a human rights perspective. They are introduced to community based social work with underrepresented and vulnerable communities in Amsterdam, such as undocumented migrants, or around urgent themes such as neighborhood cohesion, poverty and green sustainability. During this presentation, we will focus on how to create a constructive attitude towards the meaning of human rights for communities in the context of social work education.
  2. Understanding the role of the social worker in a human rights perspective from below (Elke Plovie, UCLL University of Applied Sciences). In our research on informal actors in social work practices, we noticed an interesting dynamic of citizens organizing themselves based on a common interest or shared story of violation of human rights. Citizens experience situations of injustice in their own life or are confronted with violations in the daily life of people they know. We identified two different approaches in their way of guaranteeing human rights. In a first approach, citizens develop collective solutions for a collective problem. In the second approach, citizens turn private matters into public issues. We see how citizen initiatives contribute to a process of politicization in different ways. This will be critically discussed during the presentation.
  3. Social work and Human rights: a Lifeworld Orientation (Didier Reynaert, HOGENT University of Applied Sciences and Arts). How social workers ‘act’ when construction human rights from below still remains a black box. To date, social work scholarship insufficiently succeed to gain ‘praxis-knowledge’ showing how social workers ‘act’ when using the framework of human rights. An action-based approach to social work and human rights starts from daily life experiences of people with injustice. In this presentation, we aim to give empirical insight in how social workers construct human rights from a lifeworld orientation. Based on our empirical data, we will discuss both opportunities as well as pitfalls of a lifeworld orientation on human rights in social work.

Part 2: Future Activities and Organisation of the SIG

The second part of the SIG event will provide opportunities to shape the SIG’s future. We aim to engage all participants in discussions about potential future themes and topics for the SIG. These may include community work and human rights, decolonization and human rights, responses of social work to right-wing movements in Europe, and more. Additionally, we wish to explore future modes of communication and collaboration, such as regular online SIG meetings with presentations, online seminars, book projects, etc.

To maintain the SIG’s productivity and accomplish collective activities, we also invite participants to consider becoming co-coordinators of the SIG. Only with a dedicated group of coordinators can the SIG remain active and gain more visibility. Those interested can contact the current co-coordinators beforehand. The process for appointing co-coordinators will be discussed directly at the SIG event.

SIG page

Research Methodologies for Exploring Social Work Assessment, Decision Making and Risk

09:30-09:40 Introduction: Ravit Alfandari and Campbell Killick will introduce DARSIG and present the schedule of the day.
09:40-10:30

Presentations: Each presenter will describe a research project that involves an innovative methodology that can be used to explore topics of assessment, decision making and risk. Qualitative methods that focus on meaning and quantitative methods that explore measurement and predictions will be included. Additionally, presenters will shed light on collaborative efforts and the engagement between services users and social work practitioners in researching the decision-making process.

Using Multilevel Modeling to Explore Whether Child Welfare Worker Characteristics Predict Their Decisions. Kristen Lwin, University of Windsor, Canada.

The scope of comprehensive assessment in Finnish child welfare. Anne-Mari Jaakola, University of Turku, Finland & Riitta Vornanen, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.

Predictive risk modelling as an approach for managing risk in child and family welfare services: opportunities and challenges. Liesanth Yde Nirmalarajan, Aalborg University, Denmark & Line Berg, VIA University College, Denmark.

Exploring child welfare workers’ decision-making in child sexual abuse initial investigations. Olive Lyons & Barbara Fallon, University of Toronto, Canada.

Professional judgment as interactive practice – Using a Documentary Method to reconstruct discretionary space in case conferences. Michael Rölver, University of Münster, Germany.

Mixed Methods research to explore assessment, risk and decisions in child protection and welfare. Donna O’Leary, Tusla Child and Family Agency, Ireland & Kresta M. Sørensen, Department of Social Work, University College Copenhagen, Denmark.

10:30-11:30

World Café

Small groups discussions designed to stimulate critical reflection and develop knowledge concerning the complexities and challenges involved in different methodological approaches to explore this area of practice.

11:30-12:00

Feedback and discussion

Groups facilitators describe the key themes/take-home messages developed at their group.Participants are invited to share their thoughts, experience etc.

12:00 End

SIG page

 

09:30-09:35Introduction
Dr Elaine Wilson
and Dr Niamh Flanagan       
09:35-10:10

Student supervision as a place for naming and framing diversities in Social Work Practice
Dr sc Kristina Urbanc, full professor, Dr sc Vanja Branica, associate professor, Sara Dželalija, assistant 

10:10-10:45

Practice teaching for social work students: perspectives of Croatian students and practice teachers
Dr sc Kristina Urbanc, full professor, Dr sc Vanja Branica, associate professor, Sara Dželalija, assistant 

10:45-11:00Coffee break
11:00-11:25

Square pegs in round holes? Social work practice placements and university regulations
Prof Jo Finch

11:25-12:00

Practice Education; Contemporary perspectives in Ireland
Paula Slavin, Placement Coordinator, UCD, Jean Byrnes Cummins, Placement Coordinator, MU

 

Half day events | Afternoon

The in-person SIG meeting will not take place during the conference. An online meeting will be organised, for more information please follow the Special Interest Group Page on https://www.eswra.org/sig_page_single.php?i=16

13:00-13:25Welcome and introductions of participants
13:25-14:40

Presentations “Social work during the pandemic”

  • Robotics in social work
    Wim Nieuwenboom
  • 2nd Presentation:
  • 3rd Presentation or Discussion
14:40-15:00Discussion
15:00-15:20Meeting time
15:20-15:30Final round

SIG page

13:00 – 13:05

Introduction and welcome

Kev Stone & Sarah Vicary –  University of Warwick and Open University (UK)

13:05 – 13:25

Comparing coercion in mental health and addiction care
Stefan Sjöström (Uppsala University, Sweden)

13:25 – 13:45

The development of mental health services on the island of Ireland
Danielle McIlroy (Queens University Belfast, UK)

13:45 – 14:05

Engaging with Gypsy-Travellers around their mental health and the implications for research and practice

Laura Tucker University of York

 

14:05 – 14:25

 “Clinging to my identity?” – a scoping review of the experiences of mental health social workers in non-healthcare settings.

Charlotte Scott . Affiliation to be confirmed

 

14:25 – 14:35Break
14:35 – 14:55

Approved Mental Health Professionals (UK) frameworks of understanding when considering MHA assessment decisions
Andrew Brammer (Leeds Beckett University, UK)

14:55 – 15:00

Social Work in Mental Health Settings – Illuminating social work practice in different countries
Sarah Vicary & Kev Stone, University of Warwick and Open University (UK)

15:00 – 15:10

Development of the Mental Health SIG

15:10 – 15:30

Annual General Meeting

SIG page

Slow Ethics in an Age of Fast Technology

In this workshop we will interrogate developments linked with ‘Industry 4.0’ (Artificial Intelligence (AI), Big Data, augmented reality and so on) through a slow ethical lens. We will consider first what is meant by ‘slow ethics’ and then explore two different kinds of questions, one relating to the ethical implications of new technological developments for social work and the other considering whether ethical decision-making in social work can and should be undertaken via algorithms.

Several presenters will make short arguments or provocations to stimulate reflection and discussion. We also invite further short contributions from attendees to complement those listed below. We will then engage in structured ethical dialogues based on Socratic principles of slow reasoning, careful listening, understanding, building on thoughts and arguments of others, exploring divergence and looking for commonalties.  

Provisional Programme

13:00-13:20Introductions: Sharing interests, passions and the work of SWERG to date. 
13:20-13:30

Slow Ethics

Underpinning this workshop is the concept of ‘slow ethics’. In one sense ‘ethics’ is necessarily about being slow: taking time to reflect, looking at issues from many perspectives and making considered judgements.  This is essential for carefully considering the implications of new technologies. So it may seem unnecessary to talk about ‘slow ethics’ in this context. Yet there is also a sense of ‘ethics’ that is more regulatory than reflective, equating ethics with ticking boxes and following rules. Here ‘ethical’ responses could be generated rapidly by AI.

Sarah Banks, Durham University, UK, will consider what is meant by ‘slow ethics’ and its value and limitations in social work practice in the age of Industry 4.0 and beyond.

13:30-14:15

Ethical Implications of New Technologies

What are the ethical implications (for human well-being, relationships and planetary flourishing) of the many technological developments that are being embraced or experimented with in social work around the world, from digital communications to the use of algorithms and carebots? What is the value of human relationships? What are the benefits of targeted interventions removing the room for human error and bias? 

Teresa Bertotti, University of Trento, Italy, will consider the ethical implications of the move to digital working in social work, in particular the growth of online communication and what this means for human relationships in social work practice.  

Jane Shears, British Association of Social Workers, UK, will consider whether algorithms can and should be used as alternatives to in-person/relational mental capacity assessments. For example, might removing the emotional connection between a social worker and the person being assessed make a decision fairer, and less susceptible to bias?

Netanel Gemara, University of Haifa, School of Social Work, Israel, will discuss research on  the challenges the Ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Israel faces in maintaining its distinct and segregated religious and collectivistic lifestyle amid a shift towards increased technology use in social services, accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

14:15-14:30

Ethical Decision-making by Algorithm

Can an algorithm (using AI) be designed to make ethical decisions? What is meant by an ‘ethical decision’? Should ethical decisions be based solely on norms, rules, and duties? Where does the internalization of ethics in each person come into play?

Maria Jesus Uriz, University of Navarra, Spain will argue that ethics involves very specific subjective and contextual issues. Algorithms can help individuals apply ethical principles, but they cannot replace the importance of internalization and personal reflection in ethical decision-making.

14:30-15:15

Group Ethical Dialogue Between Participants

Working through ethical implications and arguments together, in one or more facilitated groups depending on numbers.

15:15-15:30

Sharing and Concluding

What issues came up, new ideas for further research and collaborations, future activities of the group.

15:30

Closing

For further information or to offer a short contribution, please contact:

Sarah Banks, s.j.banks@durham.ac.uk and Ana Sobočan, ana.sobocan@fsd.uni-lj.si

This workshop is organised in conjunction with the journal Ethics and Social Welfare, https://www.tandfonline.com/journals/resw20   We anticipate that a report/article will be published in the journal based on the workshop contributions.      

SIG page

The Challenges of Interprofessional Research for Criminal Justice Social Work. How Does Social Work Engage in Research in Non-social Work Worlds?

SIG convenors and SIG event chairs: Caroline Bald, University of Essex, UK and María Inés Martínez Herrero, UNED, Spain

Background:

The Vilnius ECSWR 2024 will mark the first anniversary of the SWCCJ SIG. During this year SIG numbers have been growing and we have started to get to know each other and our lines of work. We were delighted to hear about several SIG members’ research in a SWCCJ ESWRA online seminar on 10/1/24 and are starting to collaborate in research publications. In this short but promising and exciting journey some themes affecting social work research in the criminal justice field are starting to emerge as important for SIG members in the discussions.  One of these is that of the challenges around interprofessional research – how social work engages in research in non-social work worlds (police, courts, prisons, etc). Hence, we would like to address this topic in the SIG event. In addition, and as stated in the inaugural SIG event in Milan, we strongly believe, drawing from the experience of our members, that international comparison and collaboration is a key avenue for learning good practice and envisaging alternative understandings, practices and regulations regarding social work in the areas of crime and criminal justice, and for enhancing social work’s contributions and influence on these (local and globally). In this regard, we are delighted to be able to include in the SIG event programme a presentation by a local social worker, based at Vilnius Caritas and working in the criminal justice social work field, who will tell us about his practice and the development of criminal justice social work in Lithuania. This will be followed by an open discussion time focusing on comparative practice and research and the challenges around interprofessional research in the field. As last year, the event will conclude with a discussion of collaborative research, research dissemination and publication opportunities which will be followed up in a SIG online meeting before the summer and actioned during the year.

Programme:

13:00-13:30Introduction to the SIG event and SIG members’ introductions & research updates
13:30-14:15

Social workers in the Lithuania criminal justice system – between prison and society
Simon Schwarz, social worker at Vilnius Caritas

14:15-14:30

Coffee break

14:30-14:50

Group discussion on:

  • Comparative practice and research in SWCCJ
  • The challenges around interprofessional research
14:50-15:30

Discussion and planning for collaborative research and publication opportunities

SIG page

Surviving or Thriving?  Navigating Challenges in Post-Soviet Social Work Through Humanistic Ideals and the use of Technology

This year our meeting with be convened by:

Dr. Sue Taplin
Co-Convenor of ESWRA Post-Soviet and Post-Socialist Special Interest Group
Senior Lecturer in Social Work, University of Winchester

and

Dr. Indrė Gajdosikienė, 
Social Worker at Šv. Kryžiaus Namai
Assistant Professor in Psychology at the Faculty of Human and Social Studies at Mykolas Romeris University, Vilnius

Social work in post-soviet countries came with humanistic ideals, which were novel for societies at the time. However, ‘survival’ values still remain a problem in post-soviet societies, forcing social workers to painstakingly look for solutions and ways to collaborate in rigid and often unfriendly environments, or succumbing to societal pressure by trying to pretend or to control. The use of technology is one example of such a duality: it can either be a way in which social workers and the people they work with can be empowered, but it can also be a means of discrimination and control.

In our meeting we will present our ideas on this important subject, and we will encourage participation and discussion from conference delegates – we look forward to seeing you there!

SIG page

Integrating Arts-Based Methods in Social Work Research within the Technological Landscape

The focus of the Arts in Social Work Special Interest Group (SIG) workshop is aligned with the conference theme Envisioning Future: Social Work Research and Discourse in the Age of Industry 4.0. In response to the changing dynamics brought about by technological innovations, we recognise the need to navigate the intersection of visual expressions and digital advancements.  This workshop endeavours to provide an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings for incorporating arts into social work within the evolving technological landscape. 

The workshop will open a space to discuss the connections, opportunities, and challenges of integrating arts-based practices in social work research and practice, with technology. We want to explore questions around how the arts can work with and complement technological advances, the impact of and dynamic interplay between arts-based methods and technological innovations on social work interactions, relationships, interventions, and practices.

This half day workshop will include presentations, space for dialogue on the synergy between arts and technological innovations in social work, as well as creating space for networking and fostering collaboration.

Call for Abstracts

Thanks to everyone who has already submitted an abstract for the Arts in Social Work SIG pre-conference event. If you would like to present your work, and haven’t submitted an abstract yet, please send an abstract (250 words) before 1st March 2024 to Dr Kalia Kaparounaki,  kkaparounaki002@dundee.ac.uk   We will then finalise a programme for the event.

SIG page

From Superwomen to Wicked Witches – Perceptions of Social Workers in Film and Television

Introduction

There has been research on the topic of “social work on film, television and in the media” for several decades. From the 1990s, Dyer (1993) and Hall (1997) contributed arguments about how the media representations of different groups (e.g. social workers) and different themes (e.g. social work) have a great impact on how the aforementioned are perceived by the rest of society. Freeman and Valentine’s studies from the early 2000s have shown that social workers are presented stereotypically, something that has also been referred to in later research. Freeman and Valentine examined social work in 44 films in the time span 1938 -1998, and found that almost all representations of social workers were negative. “If people believe what they see in the movies, social workers are mostly women, mostly white, middle-class, heterosexual; they mostly work in child welfare, are likely to be incompetent, have a tendency to engage in sexual relationships with clients, mostly work with people living in poverty, and mostly function to maintain the societal status quo” (Freeman & Valentine, 2004 p.159). Is this a prevailing interpretation in 2024? We have investigated a selection of movies and TV-series in order to figure this out, and this will be part of our discussion during the SIG.

One perspective to consider is that many different professions are portrayed on film and TV, and these portrayals are not always in line with reality either. Looking more closely at social work in particular is about finding out how this can affect motivation for education and professional practice, trust and status for the profession, and social worker identities.

This is in line with the ESWRA conference theme as both popular films and TV-series are a highly possible source of influence which is very likely to shape the discourse and changethe social work identity. Most people are not in contact with social workers during their lifetime, and have to rely on representations of social work and social workers in news, films, TV-series, social media and “through the grapevine”.

In this half day SIG-event, we have this programme:

13:00-13:15

Introduction on the background of the SIG

13:15-13:45Presentation of the participants, getting to know each other
13:45-14:15Working with opposites
14:15-14:30Selected moviecuts
14:30-15:15Discussion
15:15-15:30Plan ahead
15:30Closing

We offer popcorn, high spirits and big smiles 🙂Welcome to join us for some new insights, refreshing perspectives and interesting discussions.

SIG page

PhD/Early Career Researcher SIG Program

13:00-14:30

1. Networking Opportunities

(30 mins)

2. Speed Networking

(30 mins)

3. Three-Minute Challenge

(30 mins)

SIG page